Class 12 English Sample Paper

Sample Paper Class 12

Please refer to the Class 12 English Sample Paper for the current academic year given below. We have provided the latest CBSE Sample Papers for Term 1 and Term 2 for English Class 12. All guess sample papers have been prepared based on the latest blueprint and examination pattern for the current year. All sample papers for English Class 12 Term 1 and 2 have been given with solutions. Students can access the multiple guess papers given below. Practicing more Class 12 English Sample Papers will help you to get more marks in upcoming exams.

CBSE Sample Papers for Class 12 English

Sample Papers for Class 12 English
Class 12 English Sample Paper Set A
Term 2 Sample Papers for Class 12 English
Class 12 English Sample Paper Term 1 Set A
Class 12 English Sample Paper Term 1 Set B
Class 12 English Sample Paper Term 1 Set C
Class 12 English Sample Paper Term 1 Set D
Class 12 English Sample Paper Term 2 Set A
Class 12 English Sample Paper Term 2 Set B
Class 12 English Sample Paper Term 2 Set C

Class 12 English Sample Paper Term 2 Set A

Section–A

Reading
1. Read the passage given below.
1. No student of a foreign language needs to be told that grammar is complex. By changing word sequences and by adding a range of auxiliary verbs and suffixes, we are able to communicate tiny variations in meaning. We can turn a statement into a question, state whether an action has taken place or is soon to take place, and perform many other word tricks to convey subtle differences in meaning. Nor is this complexity inherent to the English language.

2. All languages, even those of so-called ‘primitive’ tribes have clever grammatical components. The Cherokee pronoun system, for example, can distinguish between ‘you and I’, ‘several other people and I’ and ‘you, another person and I’. In English, all these meanings are summed up in the one, crude pronoun ‘We’. Grammar is universal and plays a part in every language, no matter how widespread it is. So, the question which has baffled many linguists is—who created grammar?

3. At first, it would appear that this question is impossible to answer. To find out how grammar is created,someone needs to be present at the time of a language’s creation, documenting its emergence. Many historical linguists are able to trace modern complex languages back to earlier languages, but in order to answer the question of how complex languages are actually formed, the researcher needs to observe how languages started from scratch. Amazingly, however, this is possible.

4. Some of the most recent languages evolved due to the Atlantic slave trade. At that time, slaves from a number of different ethnicities were forced to work together under colonial rule. Since, they had no opportunity to learn each other’s languages, they developed a make-shift language called Pidgin. Pidgins are strings of words copied from the language of the landowner. They have little in the way of grammar, and in many cases, it is difficult for a listener to deduce when an event happened, and who did what to whom. Speakers need to use circumlocution in order to make their meaning understood. Interestingly,however, all it takes for a pidgin to become a complex language is for a group of children to be exposed to it at the time when they learn their mother tongue. Slave children did not simply copy the strings of words uttered by their elders; they adapted their words to create a new, expressive language. Complex grammar systems which emerge from pidgins are termed creoles and they are invented by children.

5. Some linguists believe that many of the world’s most established languages were creoles at first. The English past tense –ed ending may have evolved from the verb ‘do’. ‘It ended’ may once have been ‘It end did’. Therefore, it would appear that even the most widespread languages were partly created by
children. Children appear to have innate grammatical machinery in their brains, which springs to life when they are first trying to make sense of the world around them. Their minds can serve to create logical, complex structures, even when there is no grammar present for them to copy.
Based on your understanding of the passage, answer ANY EIGHT questions from the nine given below.

i. Why does the writer say that complex grammar systems are partly invented by children?
Answer: Children appear to have innate grammatical machinery in their brains, which springs to life when they are first trying to make sense of the world around them. Their minds can serve to create logical, complex structures, even when there is no grammar present for them to copy.

ii. What does the use of the term ‘circumlocution’ suggest in the context of the writer’s viewpoint about the evolution of grammatical systems?
Answer: Languages in their early stages, like Pidgin, have little in the way of grammar, and in many cases, it is difficult for a listener to deduce when an event happened, and who did what to whom. Speakers need to use circumlocution in order to make their meaning understood.

iii. The writer mentions looking at Atlantic slave trade for a better understanding of languages. Why do you think that is so?
Answer: The writer mentions looking at Atlantic slave trade for a better understanding of languages because it is the most recent and well documented form of linguistic study in how grammar is created.

iv. Select a suitable phrase from paragraph 3 to complete the following sentence appropriately.
He had lost everything he earned in his business, however, he bounced back and ____________ to build his business again.
Answer: He had lost everything he earned in his business, however, he bounced back and started from scratch to build his business again.

v. State any one trait of the Cherokee grammar system that is evident from paragraph 2 and provide a reason for your choice.
Answer: The Cherokee pronoun system can distinguish between ‘you and I’, ‘several other people and I’ and ‘you, another person and I’. In English, all these meanings are summed up in the one, crude pronoun ‘We’.

vi. How do linguists understand the birth of modern language rules?
Answer: Many historical linguists are able to trace modern complex languages back to earlier languages, but in order to answer the question of how complex languages are actually formed, the researcher needs to observe how languages started from scratch.

vii. Rewrite the given sentence by replacing the underlined phrase with another one, from paragraph 4.
They were moving in their new apartment so all their sleeping arrangements were temporary by the time their furniture arrived.
Answer: They were moving in their new apartment so all their sleeping arrangements were make-shift by the time their furniture arrived.

viii. Analyse why grammatical complexity is not inherent to the English language.
Answet: All languages have clever grammatical components. By changing word sequences and by adding a range of auxiliary verbs and suffixes, we are able to communicate tiny variations in meaning. We can turn a statement into a question, state whether an action has taken place

ix. Cite a point in evidence, from the text, to suggest that the language we speak is constantly changing with generations.
Answet: We use different terms to express ourselves today compared to how our grandparents spoke. Pidgin became a complex language when a group of children were exposed to it at the time when they were learning their mother tongue. Slave children did not simply copy the strings of words uttered by their elders; they adapted their words to create a new, expressive language. This suggests that the language we speak is constantly changing with generations.

2. Read the passage given below.
1. At least a third of the huge ice fields in Asia’s towering mountain chain are doomed to melt due to climate change, according to a landmark report, with serious consequences for almost 2 billion people. Even if carbon emissions are dramatically and rapidly cut and succeed in limiting global warming to 1.5°C,
36% of the glaciers along in the Hindu Kush and Himalaya range will have gone by 2100. If emissions are not cut, the loss soars to two-thirds, the report found.

2. The glaciers are a critical water store for the 250 million people who live in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya (HKH) region, and 1.65 billion people rely on the great rivers that flow from the peaks into India, Pakistan,China and other nations. “This is the climate crisis you haven’t heard of,” said Philippus Wester of the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), who led the report. “In the best of possible worlds, if we get really ambitious [in tackling climate change], even then we will lose onethird of the glaciers and be in trouble. That for us was the shocking finding.”

3. Wester said that, despite being far more populous, the HKH region had received less attention than other places, such as low-lying island states and the Arctic, that are also highly vulnerable to global warming.
Prof. Jemma Wadham, at the University of Bristol, said, “This is a landmark piece of work focused on a region that is a hotspot for climate change impacts.”

4. The new report, requested by the eight nations the mountains span, is intended to change that. More than 200 scientists worked on the report over five years, with another 125 experts peer reviewing their work. Until recently the impact of climate change on the ice in the HKH region was uncertain, said
Wester. “But we really do know enough now to take action, and action is urgently needed,” he added.
The HKH region runs from Afghanistan to Myanmar and is the planet’s “third pole”, harbouring more ice than anywhere outside Arctic and Antarctica. Limiting the global temperature rise to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels require cutting emissions to zero by 2050. This is felt to be extremely optimistic
by many but still sees a third of the ice lost, according to the report. If the global rise is 2°C, half of the glaciers are projected to melt away by 2100.

5. The melting glaciers will increase river flows through to 2050 to 2060, he said, pushing up the risk of high-altitude lakes bursting their banks and engulfing communities. But from the 2060s, river flows will go into decline. The Indus and central Asian rivers will be most affected. “Those areas will be hard hit,”
said Wester. Lower flows will cut the power from the hydrodams that generate much of the region’s electricity.

6. But the most serious impact will be on farmers in the foothills and downstream. They rely on predictable water supplies to grow the crops that feed the nations in the mountains’ shadows. But the changes to spring melting already appear to be causing the pre-monsoon river flow to fall just when farmers are planting their crops. Worse, said Wester, the monsoon is also becoming more erratic and prone to extreme downpours. “One-in-100-year floods are starting to happen every 50 years,” he said.
Based on your understanding of the passage, answer ANY SIX questions from the seven given below.

i. What does Philippus Wester mean by “This is the climate crisis you haven’t heard of”?
Answer: Wester meant that, despite being far more populous, the HKH region had received less attention than other places, such as low-lying island states and the Arctic, that are also highly vulnerable to global warming.

ii. With reference to the figure given in the passage, write one conclusion about what may happen to HKH region if Carbon emissions aren’t cut.
Answer: If the Carbon emissions aren’t cut globally, then by 2100, the global average surface warming might rise to 4.5°C and in HKH region it might be up to 5.6°C, resulting in the loss of two-thirds of its ice coverage.

iii. Why is “third pole” remarked as a significant feature of Hindu Kush-Himalaya region?
Answer: The HKH region runs from Afghanistan to Myanmar and harbours more ice than anywhere outside Arctic and Antarctica, thus aptly being named as the ‘third pole’ of the planet.

iv. For how many people who live in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya (HKH) region, the glaciers are a critical water store?
Answer: The glaciers are a critical water store for the 250 million people who live in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya region.

v. What can be concluded by the data on ice coverage loss in HKH region, with reference to the figure provided in the passage?
Answer: The impact of climate change is so severe that if all the carbon emissions are cut globally, we will lose one-third of the glaciers by 2100 and be in trouble due to rising global temperatures.

vi. How are the farmers downhill going to be affected by the changing climate and depleting ice in HKH region?
Answer: The farmers rely on predictable water supplies to grow the crops that feed the nations in the mountains’ shadows. But the changes to spring melting already appear to be causing the pre-monsoon river flow to fall just when farmers are planting their crops. One-in-100-year floods are starting to happen every 50 years.

vii. Identify a term from paragraph 4 indicating that the report, that more than 200 scientists worked on for over five years, was validated by the experts.
Answer: Peer reviewing indicates that the report, that more than 200 scientists worked on for over five years, was validated by a panel of 125 experts.

Section–B

Writing
3. The principal of your school is retiring this month. The students and the teachers want to give him a farewell party. Draft a formal invitation for the same in not more than 50 words.
Answer: WRITING
YOU ARE INVITED
The students and staff of APS school, Nagpur
feel proud in giving a farewell party
to our honourable principal after 38 years of service
Mr. Ajeet Kumar Singh
On
Wednesday
Venue: School auditorium
Time: 4:00 p.m.
With Best Compliment from:
The students and staff.

4. Attempt ANY ONE from A and B given below.
A. You are Deepak/Deepika, of 12-A, Ramanujam Road, Chennai. You have come across an advertisement in The Times of India for recruitment of computer engineer trainees by Compro Software. Apply in response to this advertisement in 120-150 words, giving your detailed bio-data. Invent all necessary
details.
COMPRO SOFTWARE
REQUIRES
Computer Engineer Trainees
Applicant must possess degree in computer applications and should be
B.Tech. in Computer Engineering.
WALK IN INTERVIEW on:
30th May, 20XX (Saturday)
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
For further details, experience, remuneration, etc. please visit website :
https://www.com.ac.in/facultyrecruitment
OR
B. You are Krishna/Kavita, a resident of Sunshine Helios. Recently the festival of Janmashtmi has been
celebrated enthusiastically in your society. Write a report on the same in 120-150 words. You may use
the cues given below along with your own ideas.
• Devotion and enthusiasm seen everywhere
• Nicely decorated Balgopal was kept inside the temple
• Devotees offered prayers
• Cultural programs conducted
• Program ended with singing of bhajans
Answer: 12-A, Ramanujan Road
Chennai
13th May, 20XX
The HR Manager
Compro Software
Bangalore
Subject: Application for the post of computer engineer trainees
Dear Sir,
In response to your advertisement in The Times of India dated 11th May 20XX, I wish to be considered
for the position mentioned above. I feel my qualifications and experience are good enough to enable me
to discharge my duties. I attach herewith attested copies of my certificates and my bio-data. If given a
chance, I assure you that I would contribute my best to the work for your company. For reference, I am
enclosing my resume as under.
Thanking you,
Yours sincerely,
Deepak/Deepika
Name : Deepak/Deepika
Father’s Name : K.M. Mathur
Date of Birth : 31st August, 1998
Address : 12-A, Ramanujam Road, Chennai-XXXXXX
Phone- 98XXXXXXXX
E-Mail Address : dep123@gmail.com
Marital Status : Unmarried
Nationality : Indian
Educational Qualifications : (i) B. Tech. Computer Engineering, Chennai
(ii) Bachelor of Computer Application, Chennai
Experience Fresher
Strengths : Proficiency in Mathematics, analytical and critical thinking
Languages : Good command over spoken and written Hindi & English.
Hobbies : Reading and Writing Poems
References : 1. Rohan Kamath, Sales Head, Phoenix Ltd. Pune, Ph.-XXXXXXXXXX
2. Aniket Sharma, Professor, Delhi. Ph.- XXXXXXXXXX
OR
4.B. Answer:
Janmashtami Celebration
By Krishna/Kavita
27th August, 20XX, Delhi: The great Hindu festival of Janmashtami celebrates the birth (Janm) of Lord Krishna on the eighth day of te dark fortnight of the month of Bhadrapada. The number eight has another significance in the Krishna legend in that he is the eighth child of his mother Devaki.
Like last year, Janmashtami was celebrated with great devotion and enthusiasm at Sunshine Helios on 24th August this year. On this occasion, the society temple was decorated with flowers and lights.
Idol of Balgopal was kept in a cradle inside the temple and nicely decorated. Devotees, young and old,visited the temple and offered prayers. Needless to say, all of them did the ritual of swinging belovedBalgopal and sought his blessings. A stage was set up in front of the temple for cultural programs. The dance programs by children as well as adults were really outstanding with dancers dancing to the tune of songs depicting stories of Radha and Krishna. The program ended with singing of bhajans by senior citizens.

Section–C

Literature

5. Attempt ANY FIVE of the six questions given below, within 40 words each.

i. Should criminals in the prison be given the opportunity of learning and education.
Answer: No one should be denied the right to education. If the criminals in prison are provided with education and work-skills, their life can turn towards a bright and crime-free future. Education can help them become responsible citizens; therefore, efforts should be put in to provide opportunity of learning and
education even to the criminals in prisons.

ii. What was the reaction of the peasants of Champaran when they came to know that a Mahatma had come to help them?
Answer: When the peasants of Champaran came to know that a Mahatma had come to help them, they gathered in Motihari in large numbers. Thousands of peasants held a demonstration around the courthouse where Gandhiji was supposed to appear. The crowd was so uncontrollable that the officials felt powerless toregulate the crowd.

iii. ‘It’s all relative, beauty and beast.’ Justify the statement given by Mr. Lamb
Answer: Mr. Lamb told Derry that there are plenty of things to stare at and the people should not mind their disability because they will be soon tired of it. He further told Derry that beauty or ugliness depends upon an individual’s perception. One might see beauty in a thing but to another it might be a beast.

iv. What does the reference ‘simple sheep’ in the poem, A Thing of Beauty, symbolise?
Answer: Lambs and sheep are envisioned as the embodiments of innocent and serene beauty. Jesus Christ, as an apostle of peace, was a shepherd and was seen surrounded by his flock of sheep, his followers. The poet has made specific reference to the sheep as symbols of ‘divine beauty’.

v. Explain: ‘massive weight of Uncle’s wedding band’.
Answer: The expression is symbolic of male authority and power. Matrimony bounds the woman physically as well as mentally. Likewise, Aunt Jennifer was trapped in gender oppression and felt herself burdened by the authority of her husband.

vi. How does the metaphor of rattrap serve to highlight the human predicament?
Answer: The world is like a rattrap because we get attracted by the luxuries of the worst pleasures and once it happens, we are entrapped by them and forget the acts of kindness. We ought to help each other but we don’t. We ignore the plight of the ones in need. The peddler makes a much deeper comment on the life and he himself realises it only when he appreciates the kindness shown to him by Edla.

6. Answer ANY TWO of the following in about 120-150 words each.

i. Jo was not satisfied with the ending of the story. How did she want it to end and why?
Answer: Jo was not convinced with the ending of the story and wanted another end. She coaxed her father to retell the story the next day giving the story a predetermined path that she had set. Jo refused to accept the end where Roger Skunk’s mother hits the wizard and that too without being hit back. On the other hand, Jack, her father, defended mother’s decision on how their children should be like. Jo wanted the story to end on a note where the old Wizard takes revenge on the mother and hit Mommy Skunk hard on her head and refuse to get Roger back to his original smell. She wanted this to happen because she could not see Roger Skunk being left alone by his friends. According to her, Roger was perfect in smelling like roses and that his friends won’t run away from him anymore. She didn’t understand the purpose behind Mommy Skunk’s eagerness to get her little roger back to smelling foul.

ii. Write in brief the central idea of the poem, Aunt Jennifer’s Tigers.
Answer: In the poem “Aunt Jennifer’s Tigers”, the poet Adrienne Rich, narrates the tale of an old woman, Aunt Jennifer. She is a typical housewife who feels weighed down by her marriage. She is embroidering tigers on a frame. Aunt Jennifer has suffered all her life because of male-dominance. The tigers she is
embroidering are in fact symbol of her husband. They can also be seen as a symbol of a woman’s creative energy. The women give birth to men and the same men tyrannise women when they grow up. The poet says that Aunt is crushed due to male chauvinism and it appears she won’t be free from the bondage of her household chores, remaining subservient to her husband, even after her death

iii. What change did Mr. Lamb bring in Derry’s attitude towards life?
Answer: Mr. Lamb gave confidence and courage to Derry. He made Derry understand that the world is full of good and bad things and he should learn to accept both. He suggested Derry to get over his physical impairment instead of brooding over his burnt face. He told him that he still had two hands, two legs,eyes, a tongue and a brain. Thus, Mr. Lamb helped Derry to transform. Derry would change even after Mr. Lamb’s death because by that time his attitude towards life had already changed. Before meeting Mr. Lamb, Derry used to remain dejected and had negative thoughts. He was always worried about his face and how people commented on the scar on his face. But after meeting Mr. Lamb, he developed positive thoughts and not cared about what people thought about him and his face. This is evident when he ran back to Mr. Lamb and didn’t listen to the negative thoughts of his mother. He wanted to grab the opportunities that the world had to offer him and wanted to be in the company of Mr. Lamb. This is contradicting from the act that earlier, he used to seclude himself and never come close to a stranger.

Class 12 English Sample Paper