Unseen Passage For Class 9 English With Answers Pdf

Unseen Passage Class 9

Read the following passage carefully. 

BENEFITS OF POLITENESS

(1) Politeness has been well-defined as benevolence in trifles. It is the desire to put those whom we meet perfectly at ease, and save them from every kind of petty discomfort and annoyance. The limited part of benevolence called politeness requires only an inclination to make them happy temporarily, while they are in our presence, and can be done without any sacrifice on our part or only with a slight sacrifice of our personal comfort.

(2) Politeness is said to be one of the most important characteristics of a civilised person. Politeness is the art of choosing from among your thoughts. It must be implemented in every walk of life. When we deal with people elder to us, we are polite. But an honest polite person is polite with everyone, including people of lower status, workers, and even children. Not just with humans, we must also be polite with animals as they help us.

(3) Politeness is a skill, and like any other skill, can be mastered with practice. The greatest enemy of politeness is ego. To be a polite person, you have to sacrifice your ego. It is difficult for an egoist to be polite. You have to imply politeness in your thinking, speech, and action. Actions speak louder than words. Polite actions will render fine results. Politeness will reduce your stress and boost you to be productive. Apart from your present benefits, you protect your future. Being polite makes you mentally healthy.

(4) Different rules of behaviour have to be observed depending on whether we are in the street or the drawing room, at home or school, among friends or with strangers, and so on. Our behaviour also varies on the basis of the country we hail from as there is great diversity of social etiquette between the cultures of different countries.

(5) Politeness, besides being a duty that we owe to others, is a valuable possession for ourselves. It costs nothing, and yet may, in many cases, bring much profit. The great advantage of this excellence of conduct was very clearly expressed by Dr Johnson when he said that the difference between a well-bred and an ill-bred man is that the former immediately attracts your liking and the latter your dislike.

Question. Which of the following best explains the phrase ‘actions speak louder than words’?
(a) What someone actually does means more than what they say will do.
(b) What someone says shows their intentions and feelings more clearly than what they do.
(c) People are more likely to believe what you say than what you do.
(d) Words have a greater impact than actions on someone.

Answer

C

Question. ‘Being polite will render fine results’. Substitute the underlined word with the most appropriate option from the following.
(a) Give
(b) Leave
(c) Support
(d) Surrender

Answer

B

Question. Define politeness.
(a) Doing something without any sacrifice.
(b) An inclination to make people happy temporarily.
(c) The desire to put those whom we meet perfectly at ease.
(d) A skill to annoy someone’s personal comfort.

Answer

C

Question. Based on your reading of the passage, choose the incorrect statement from the following.
(a) There is great diversity of social etiquette between the cultures of different countries.
(b) Being polite makes you mentally weak.
(c) The greatest enemy of politeness is ego.
(d) Politeness is a skill.

Answer

B

Question. Our behaviour varies on the basis of:
(a) diversity of social etiquette
(b) the country we hail from
(c) the excellence of conduct
(d) politeness in thinking, speech and action

Answer

B

Read the following passage carefully.

ZOO OR NO ZOO

(1) The funding crisis at many zoos has reopened the debate over the value of zoos and whether they should be allowed to exist at all.

(2) People who are in favour of zoos argue that they perform an essential role in conserving rare animal species. Conservationists estimate that today at least 1,000 species of animals are threatened. Over the past 20 years, zoos have developed programmes designed to help preserve endangered species. This involves breeding animals in captivity in ‘captive breeding programmes’ and then reintroducing them into their natural habitats, to replenish the number living in the wild.

(3) Zoos cooperate with each other in order to ensure the success of their breeding programmes. Animals are passed from one zoo to another in order to prevent inbreeding. If animals that are closely related to one another mate, there is a danger that they will produce deformed offspring.

(4) If zoos were forced to close, it would be disastrous for world conservation, say zoo supporters, adding that most animals in captivity would have to be killed.

(5) According to the National Federation of Zoos, it does not take much imagination to realise that the closure of all zoos would mean the deliberate destruction of wildlife on a scale never before witnessed.

(6) Opponents of zoos accept that some species have been saved from extinction by the captive breeding programmes, but they argue that this offers no solution to the worldwide conservation crisis.

(7) The number of animals protected by zoos is tiny compared with the overall problem. It costs millions to save the Arabian oryx from dying out; but could that amount be available for every species that is endangered? The value of zoo-breeding programmes is also questioned as some species, such as the African elephant, do not reproduce well in captivity.

(8) Captive animals are often kept in poor and inhumane conditions, the opponents say. In the worst zoos, animals are still displayed for the purpose of public entertainment. When animals are placed in impoverished and unsuitable surroundings, they often behave in abnormal and neurotic ways. It is common for polar bears to constantly pace up and down or twist their heads. This behaviour is now recognised by scientists as a sign of stress and frustration.

(9) When children visit zoos where animals are acting in neurotic and abnormal ways, they are not being educated. Instead, opponents say, they are being given information that is inaccurate.

Question. Which of the following explains the word ‘opponent’?
(a) A person who advises others
(b) A person who engages in a fight
(c) A person who supports something or someone
(d) A person who disagrees with something or someone

Answer

D

Question. Based on your reading of the passage, choose the incorrect statement from the following.
(a) The number of animals protected by zoos is tiny compared with the overall problem.
(b) It is common for polar bears to constantly pace up and down or twist their head.
(c) Conservationists estimate that today at least 1,000 species of animals are threatened.
(d) Animals are passed from one zoo to another in order to prevent infection.

Answer

D

Question. Why do opponents say that the children are not being educated by visiting zoos?
(a) Because animals are displayed only for the purpose of public entertainment
(b) Because animals are placed in impoverished and suitable surroundings
(c) Because the children are provided with inaccurate information about the way animals act
(d) All of these

Answer

C

Question. What has reopened the debate over the values of zoos?
(a) Existence of many zoos
(b) Funding crisis at many zoos
(c) Cruelty towards animals
(d) None of these

Answer

B

Question. Why do zoos cooperate with each other?
(a) To help preserve endangered species
(b) To ensure the success of their breeding programmes
(c) To conserve rare animal species
(d) None of these

Answer

B

Read the following passage carefully. 

GIRL CHILD EDUCATION

(1) The education of a child starts from the family where the mother is the first teacher. But the irony in India is that although the deity of education is a female, that is, Goddess Saraswati, according to Hinduism, innumerable number of women remain illiterate here. They do not remain uneducated by choice but are forbidden from receiving education because of the patriarchal system in the society. Right from the early Vedic period, people have been celebrating the birth of a son, nevertheless, in those days, daughters were not neglected but were educated well. However, during the later Vedic period, daughters were considered a social burden. Only the girls belonging to upper class families enjoyed the right of education and got proper nourishment. In the medieval period, the conditions deteriorated for the females, even in royal families. Girls could not get the same status as the boys. In Muslim households, they were taught at their homes, while Hindu girls enjoyed the privilege of getting primary education along with the boys in schools.

(2) The prevalence of child marriage was excessively practised then. However, in the nineteenth century, many social reformers like Raja Ram Mohan Roy, Sir Syed Ahmed Khan, Annie Besant, M. G. Ranade, Jyotiba Phule and Swami Dayanand Saraswati came forward for the emancipation of women in India. Raja Ram Mohan Roy especially advocated female education.

(3) Since then, there has been tremendous progress in every field, but unfortunately, girls are still neglected. In most families, the birth of a girl child is not desired and, if accepted, she is considered inferior to boys and her education is not considered important because it seems a waste of money to the majority of the parents. They think it unreasonable because, later on they would be compelled to spend a heavy amount on her dowry. So, the female literacy rate is unsatisfactory. This has a direct impact on the overall development of the nation.

Question. In the medieval period, the conditions deteriorated for the females, and even in:
(a) the working class
(b) the trading community
(c) the educated community
(d) the royal families

Answer

D

Question. What has a direct impact on the overall development of the nation?
(a) Female literacy rate
(b) Birth of a girl child
(c) Child marriage
(d) Proper nourishment

Answer

A

Question. Which of the following statement is NOT TRUE, according to the passage?
(a) Female literacy rate is unsatisfactory.
(b) The birth of a girl child is not desired.
(c) Annie Besant advocated female education.
(d) In Muslim households, girls were taught at their homes.

Answer

C

Question. Why were women not allowed to receive education?
(a) Due to the patriarchal system in the society
(b) Due to the matriarchal system in the society
(c) Due to the nuclear nature of the society
(d) Due to the joint nature of the family

Answer

A

Question. What was enjoyed by the girls belonging to upper class families during later vedic period?
(a) Right to education
(b) Proper nourishment
(c) Both (a) and (b)
(d) Neither (a) nor (b)

Answer

C

1. Although everybody has a creative spark, the potential is not always fully utilized. How does one recognize those who are developing their creative energies to the fullest extent? Mad painters and tormented poets are only comic stereotypes of the creative personality. The essential traits of creativity are found among a wide variety of less conspicuous creators, people in all walks of life. Unfortunately, the structure of our social and educational environment does not always promote its growth.

2. Generally speaking, creative people often believe their purpose in life is to discover and implement the interrelatedness of things, to make order out of disorder. They also see problems where others see none and question the validity of even the most widely accepted answers. Creative persons are compulsive problem seekers, not so much because they thrive on problems, but because their senses are attuned to a world that demands to be put together, like a jigsaw puzzle scattered on a table.

3. Several tests now in use reveal that highly creative people are much more open and receptive to the complexities of experience than less creative people. The creative temperament has a tendency to break problems down into their most basic elements and then reconstruct them into whole new problems, thereby discovering new relationships and new solutions. Highly creative people aren’t afraid to ask what may seem to be naive or silly questions. They ask questions like, “Why don’t spiders get tangled up in their own webs?” and, “Why do dogs turn in circles before lying down?” Such questions may seem childlike, and in a way they are.

4. Unlike children, creative people appear to have vast stores of patience to draw upon. Months, years, even decades can be devoted to a single problem. The home that encourages inquisitiveness contributes to creative development. The teacher who stresses questions rather than answers and rewards curiosity rather than restricting it, is teaching a child to be creative. To be extremely intelligent is not the same as to be gifted in creative work. The Quiz Kids are often referred to as geniuses. They would undoubtedly score high in memory functions. But it is doubtful whether they are also fluent in producing ideas. Contrary to popular myths that glorify youth, more creative achievements are likely to occur when people grow older. While memory may falter with age, creativity is ageless.

Question. Select the option that makes the correct use of ‘receptive’ as used in the passage, to fill in the blank space.   
(a) She was in a coma, totally …………………. .
(b) They were …………………. to the complexities of experience.
(c) He is a cold, unfeeling and …………………. man.
(d) A healthy diet creates a body …………………. to disease.

Answer

B

Question. Highly creative people:     
(a) always hesitate to ask silly questions.
(b) never hesitate to ask silly questions.
(c) are introvert.
(d) None of these

Answer

B

Question. Which quote captures the central idea of para 4?   

Unseen Passage For Class 9 English With Answers Pdf

(a) Option 1
(b) Option 2
(c) Option 3
(d) Option 4

Answer

B

Question. The word ‘attuned’ as used in para 2 does NOT mean the same as:   
(a) accustomed
(b) aware
(c) unknown
(d) adapted

Answer

C

Question. The antonym of ‘inquisitiveness’ as used in para 4 is:   
(a) curiosity
(b) fear
(c) uninterested
(d) intelligence

Answer

C

Question. “They thrive on problems” means:   
(a) they are afraid of problems.
(b) they create problems for others.
(c) they tackle problems vigorously.
(d) they create problems for themselves deliberately.

Answer

C

Question. What is/are the characteristic(s) of a creative person? He/she is:   
(a) imaginative
(b) curious
(c) a problem seeker
(d) All of these

Answer

D

Question. “Although everybody has a creative spark, the potential is not always fully utilized.” It means that some people:   
(a) are too lazy to use their full potential.
(b) are demotivated by society to use their full potential.
(c) are not aware about their latent creative potential.
(d) are reluctant to use their full potential.

Answer

C

Question. Creative people’s purpose in life is to:   
(a) discover the interrelatedness of things.
(b) discover and implement the interrelatedness of things.
(c) make order out of disorder.
(d) All of these

Answer

D

Question. Creative people are:   
(a) problem seekers.
(b) attuned to a world that demands to be put together.
(c) Both (a) and (b)
(d) Neither (a) nor (b)

Answer

C

Read the passage given below and complete the sentences that follow : 

Then all the windows of the grey wooden house (Miss Hilton used to live here. She expired last week) were thrown open, a thing I had never seen before. At the end of the day a sign was nailed on the mango tree : FOR SALE Nobody in the street knew Miss Hilton. While she lived in the house her front gate was always locked and no one ever saw her leave or saw anybody go in. So even if you wanted to, you couldn’t feel sorry and say that you missed Miss Hilton. When I think of her house I see just two colors—grey and green. The green of the ango tree, the grey of the house and the grey of the high iron fence that prevented you from getting at the mangoes. If your cricket ball fell in Miss Hilton’s courtyard you never got it back. It wasn’t the mango season when Miss Hilton died. But we got back about ten or twelve of our cricket balls. The house was sold and we were prepared to dislike the new owners ever before they came. I think we were a little worried. Already we had one resident of the street who kept on complaining about us to our parents. He complained that we played cricket on the pavement and if we were not playing cricket he complained that we were making too much noise anyway. One afternoon when I came back from school Pal said, “Is a man and a woman. She pretty pretty, but he ugly like hell.” I didn’t see much. The front gate was open but the windows were shut again. I heard a dog barking in an angry way.
One thing was settled pretty quickly. Whoever these people were, they would never be the sort of people to complain that we were making noise and disturbing their sleep. A lot of noise came from the house that night. The radio was switched on full volume until midnight when the radio station closed down. The dog was barking and the man was shouting. I didn’t hear the woman.

Question. Which two colors were there in Miss Hilton’s house?
Answer. Green and Grey were the two colors in Miss Hilton’s house.

Question. How many cricket balls did the boys get back from Miss Hilton’s house?
Answer. The boys got back about ten or twelve cricket balls from Miss Hilton’s house.

Question. A man was shouting, a dog was barking, only ____________.
Answer. the woman was unheard.

Question. Who were the three new owners of Miss Hilton’s house?
Answer. The pretty woman, her ugly husband and their pet dog were the three owners of Miss Hilton’s house.

Question. One of the residents of the speaker’s street always complained against them to
(a) other neighbors
(b) their teachers
(c) their parents
(d) their friends

Answer

C

Question. The ___________ was switched on full volume until midnight in new neighbor’s house.
(a) television
(b) radio
(c) home theatre
(d) music system

Answer

B

Question. ‘For sale’sign was nailed on?
(a) Neem tree
(b) The Mango tree
(c) Gulmohar tree
(d) Banyan tree

Answer

B

Question. What was the color of high iron fence?
(a) Blue
(b) Green
(c) Brown
(d) Grey

Answer

D

Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow : 
Kausani is situated at a height of 6,075 feet in the central Himalayas. It is an unusually attractive little town. It covers just about 5.2 sq. km. It lies to the north of Almora in Uttarakhand’s picturesque Kumaon region. Kausani provides the 300 km. wide breathtaking view of the Himalayas. It is the most striking aspect of this place. Snow-capped peaks are spread in a stately row. They stare at you in silvery-white majesty. The most famous peak on view is Nanda Devi, the second highest mountain in India. It is situated at a height of 25,645 feet and is 36 miles away as the crow flies. The other famous peaks on view are Choukhamba (23,420 feet) and Trishul (23,360 feet). Then there are also Nilkanth,  andaghunti, Nandaghat and Nandakot. On a clear day, the blue of the sky makes a splendid background to these peaks. At sunrise and at sunset, when the colour of the sky changes to a golden range, the scene gets etched in your memory. When Gandhiji visited this place in 1929, its scenic beauty held him spellbound. He named it the ‘Switzerland of India’. He prolonged his two day stay to fourteen days, making time to write a book, ‘Anashakti Yoga’. The place where he was staying was originally a guest house of a tea estate. It was renamed ‘Anashakti Ashram’ after the book. Kausani is the birthplace of Sumitranandan Pant, India’s poet laureate. Its natural surroundings inspired many of his poems. Its tea gardens mingle with dense pine forests and fruit orchards. The area is also host to many fairs and religious ceremonies. If Uttarakhand is the abode of Gods, Kausani is God’s own backyard. There is no traffic, no one is in a hurry. If serenity could be put on a canvas, the picture would resemble Kausani.

Question. Gandhiji named Kausani as ‘the __________ of India’.
Answer. ‘Switzerland of India’

Question. Kausani is a birth place of which Indian poet?
Answer. Kausani is the birth place of Sumitranandan Pant.

Question. __________ is the abode of Gods.
Answer. Uttarakhand

Question. Kausani’s guest house of the tea estate is now known as __________.
Answer. Anashakati Ashram

Question. At sunrise and at sunset the color of the sky changes to   
(a) silverish grey
(b) golden orange
(c) blue
(d) white

Answer

B

Question. Gandhiji prolonged his two day stay to   
(a) One week
(b) 10 days
(c) 14 days
(d) 15 days

Answer

C

Question. Kausani is situated at a height of __________ feet in the Central Himalayas.   
(a) 7125
(b) 6075
(c) 6175
(d) 4275

Answer

B

Question. In which year Gandhiji visited Kausani?   
(a) 1914
(b) 1925
(c) 1935
(d) 1929

Answer

D

Read the following passage carefully and answer the following questions : 

(1) The white tiger is an offspring of Bengal tiger, which has the necessary gene for white coloring. It has beautiful black stripes on a white coat. This species of animal has blue eyes and a pink nose.

(2) A pure white tiger is totally white without any stripe, which is due to the presence of double recessive allele in the genetic code. It happens only in the Bengal tiger subspecies, and only one in 10,000 births can have it naturally. White tigers are rarely seen in the wild, and only twelve of them have been spotted in India since last one-hundred years. Tigers have a life-span of 10-15 years. They are solitary animals, and are fond of hunting at night. Their diet consists of any animals that they can catch, and can eat up to 40 pounds of meat at one time. After such a big meal, they usually remain away for several days from food.

(3) They are slow runners, but good swimmers. They are poor climbers and cannot climb a tree easily. They live in an area ranging from 10 to 30 square miles depending upon the availability of prey, water and shelter. Habitat loss, poaching and expansion of human population have together contributed to their becoming endangered. They are widely hunted for their body-parts, which are used in traditional Chinese medicines.

(4) Genetic inbreeding is another reason for their endangerment. Due to shortage in their number, this species of animal has been subjected to inbreeding. It has resulted in high mortality rates and severe disabilities. About 80 percent of the white tiger cubs are born with serious birth-defects related to inbreeding, and they soon die-off.

(5) The critical condition of this animal has attracted the attention of conservationists worldwide. World Wildlife Federation (WWF), defenders of wildlife, and many other wildlife organizations are working with the support of the government for the cause of protecting them from becoming extinct. Once they become extinct, it will not be possible to bring them back to life.

Question. What affects the tiger from remaining away for several days from food?
Answer. A big meal affects the tiger from remaining away for several days from food.

Question. Find the word from the passage which means same as ‘hereditary’.
Answer. genetic

Question. Name any two agencies working for the protection of tigers.
Answer. World Wildlife Federation (WWF), Defenders of Wildlife

Question. What two factors have put tigers species in the category of the endangered animals?
Answer. Habitat loss, poaching, and genetic inbreeding (any two) are the factors that have put the tiger species in the category of the endangered animals.

Question. Tigers are ___________ climbers and cannot climb a tree easily.
(a) expert
(b) goat
(c) poor
(d) worst

Answer

C

Question. A pure ___________ tiger is totally white without any stripes.
(a) White
(b) Yellow
(c) Golden
(d) Brown

Answer

A

Question. What is the life span of a tiger?
(a) 5-10 years
(b) 10-15 years
(c) 15-20 years
(d) 20-25 years

Answer

B

Question. The White tiger is an offspring of
(a) Rajasthan tiger
(b) Chennai tiger
(c) Punjab tiger
(d) Bengal tiger

Answer

D

Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow : 
Evelyn Glennie was born in 1965 and grew up on a farm near Aberdeen in Scotland. She loved playing music, and her ambition was to become a solo percussionist. She started having problems with her ears and began to lose her hearing. By the time she was twelve, she was deaf. She couldn’t hear at all. Evelyn became very angry; it seemed to her that she would never fulfil her dream of being a great musician. After a while Evelyn stopped being angry and instead found ways of adapting her playing to suit her deafness. At the age of sixteen, she became the first deaf student at the Royal Academy in London. She went on to make lots of CDs and is now famous for being the world’s only full time solo percussionist. Evelyn likes to play unusual instruments and has over a thousand instruments some of which she has made herself. She likes to play with musicians from all over the world, and requests composers to create music especially for her. An example of this is a piece, which was composed for her by the jazz composer Diango Bates, for which kitchen pots and pans were used as instruments. Her sixteen solo albums (including twelve on the RCA/BMG label) have reached a remarkably diverse public, as have her numerous collaborations with musicians from the non-classical world. Glennie contends that hearing is a form of touch, and that everyone, whether “deaf” or not, processes sound in an individual way. When Evelyn performs, she doesn’t wear shoes or socks. This is to enable her to feel the music through the floor and her body. Usually, percussionists play at the back of the Orchestra, Evelyn plays at the front so that she can lip-read signals from the conductor. Glennie has said that she doesn’t want an operation to cure her deafness; she likes being who she is and doesn’t want to change the way she works. Like many other courageous people, she tries hard to help others. She has helped many deaf children by giving them an opportunity to learn a musical instrument.

Question. What is she now famous for?
Answer. Glennie is now famous for being the world’s only full time solo percussionist.

Question. Why does she not wear shoes or socks when she performs?
Answer. Evelyn Glennie does not wear shoes or socks when she performs to enable her to feel the music through the floor and her body.

Question. Why did Glennie refuse to get herself cured?
Answer. Glennie refused to be cured because she liked being who she was and didn’t want to change the way she worked.

Question. What was Glennie’s ambition?
Answer. Glennie’s ambition was to become a solo percussionist.

Question. Why did she become very angry?
Answer. Glennie became angry because she thought she would never be able to fulfill her dream of becoming a great musician.

Question. What is meant by the word ‘unusual’?
(a) uncommon
(b) unknown
(c) employment
(d) uncover

Answer

A

Question. Find the word opposite in meaning to ‘disable’.
(a) enable
(b) retain
(c) keep
(d) draw

Answer

A

Question. What is meant by the word, ‘ambition’?
(a) goal in life
(b) hope
(c) employment
(d) success

Answer

A

Question. Find the word opposite in meaning to ‘happy’.
(a) solo
(b) angry
(c) hearing
(d) helpless

Answer

B

Question. Find the synonym of the word ‘content’.
(a) satisfy
(b) assert
(c) keep
(d) draw

Answer

A